Over the past two years, you may have got used to seeing 20 does wandering around with collars that have four large tags in a variety of colours hanging from their necks. These deer are the control group for the Oak Bay Urban Deer Research Project and the collars are equipped with GPS, which has allowed our research team to track the does and collect data on their movement patterns, numbers, density and more.

This fall, 60 does, not including the control group, received an immuno-contraceptive (IC) vaccine. In order to be able to evaluate the impact of IC on the deer population, these does were fitted with a simple collar, as well as ear tags. The collars and ear tags are colour coded in order to allow for individual identification and give our researchers precise information.

The two collars fit very differently. The 20 GPS collars are quite loose, to allow for movement of the collar when the deer are moving and eating, due to the GPS “box” and the tags.

The IC collars do not have a large GPS box on them, or tags. Instead, the identification system is based on the colour of the collars, and the colour of two numbered ear tags that were also put on the does (along with one small provincial tag). These collars fit high on the neck and are quite snug to reduce chafing – we are always looking for ways to ensure the comfort of the deer. The fit of these collars minimizes movement as it’s not necessary without the tags and GPS box. The collars fit like a dog collar, allowing for two/three fingers to slide comfortably under the collar. They were fitted very carefully by our wildlife veterinarian, Dr. Hering.

We have had a few concerned citizens contact us that the collars seem too tight, and that the neck of the doe is “bulging” over the collar. Dr. Hering followed up on one such sighting a few weeks ago, and he was still able to easily slide his fingers under the collar – it was just the winter fur that has grown in since the field work that made it look tighter. He was happy to report that the fur and skin under the collar were in good shape.

Despite the collars appearing very snug, a few of the collars may have still been loose enough to slip down the neck a little bit, in fact unintentionally tightening them. We don’t think this is an issue and that it’s still the fur that creates the illusion of the collars appearing overly tight. However we have really appreciated citizens taking photos and letting us know of their concerns so that we can follow up. We recently had a reporting of a doe in the Falkland area that Dr. Hering would like to check out. If you see her, please note the colour of her collar and ear tags and send us an email at info@uwss.ca so that we can locate her and have Dr. Hering evaluate.

Some people have also expressed concern that the collars will tighten as young deer grow. The collars on younger deer were fitted a bit more loosely to allow for growing over the winter. The collars all have a “rot off” so that over time the elements will cause the material to break down and the collars will drop off. For more information on the collars please go to https://uwss.ca/faqs-about-collars/ .

As always, we are grateful for the involvement of the community in this project. Our goal is to provide evidence-based, scientific information without compromising the deer. Their well-being is our first priority. If you do see a doe that concerns you, please contact us. It would be very helpful if you could note the collar colour and ear tag colour/number if possible. If you can safely take a photo, that would also be very helpful.

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